Frequently Asked Questions


If you have a question that you do not see the answer to, please do not hesitate to contact us directly.

Are the clutches adjustable?

No, the clutches are not adjustable. The clutches are pre-set to a specific torque at the factory. The clutches are used in the cutter to protect the motors from prematurely burning up. Should the clutches not slip at the proper torque there is a greater risk of burning up the motors. Replacing the clutch if it is locked up will save you money in the long run. Clutches are cheaper then motors. If the clutch slips too soon it’s time to replace the clutch. Accumulated moisture inside the cutter can cause the clutch to slip or lock-up.

What size air compressor do I need?

Average minimum requirement - 150 psi / 40 CFM or 11 bar / 19 liters/s. Air Dryer at compressor recommended, see your local air compressor representative for recommendations for your system. Hose lengths of 1,000 ft. / 305M will require larger capacity air compressor, see question “What size air hose do I need?”.

What size air hose do I need?

 

Inside diameter and length of hose on reel will determine at what pressure to set your regulator to at the compressor, to achieve 90 PSI at the cutter. See bottom line in chart to determine pressure setting.

 

USA Units of Measure
Name
Units
Value
To achieve 90 PSI at cutting head
Hose inner diameter must be
inch
5/8
3/4
Total hose length
feet
300
400
500
750
1,000
300
400
500
750
1,000
Set air pressure at compressor to
psi
116
124
131
147
162
101
104
107
115
122

 

Metric Units of Measure
Name
Units
Value
Compressor flow rating (minimum)
liters/s
19
Pressure at cutting head
bar
6
Hose inner diameter must be
mm
16
19
Total hose length
M
90
120
150
230
305
90
120
150
230
305
Set air pressure at compressor to
bar
8.0
8.5
9.0
10.2
11.2
7.0
7.2
7.4
8.0
8.4

 AIR CONNECTION AT ROBOT –¼” NPT THREADS.

My air router spins freely when running it above ground, as soon as I put it in the pipe and start cutting it stalls. Why is this happening?

There are three possible reasons this can occur: 

  1. Your airline is too small, see chart under ” What size air hose do I need?”
  2. Your air compressor is too small; see answer to question under “What size air compressor do I need?” 
  3. Your air router is worn. Worn vanes or bearing caps can cause air to escape, causing the air router to lose torque.
What are the electrical requirements for the control box?

CONTROL BOX –
19-46045 & 19-46053
9-00175
INPUT POWER -
120 VOLTS AC, 60 Hz
120/240 VOLTS AC, 50/60 Hz
OUTPUT POWER –
all axis - 38 VDC +/- 2 VOLTS
all axis - 39 VDC +/- 2 VOLTS

POWER SOURCE HOOK-UP – Standard American flat blade 2 pole / 3 wire outlet.

I ran my cutter a couple of times and now one of the axes doesn’t work. I haven’t used it in weeks or months. What is happening?

 

Moisture is the problem. The moisture comes from the compressed air you use to run the air router and inflate the airbags. The compressed air produced from your compressor will contain water in the form of vapor and liquid after it is compressed. All atmospheric air contains water vapor and the higher your local humidity the greater the impact. When the air is compressed, some of the water is squeezed out of the air and changes from a vapor to a liquid. The liquid gets pushed down the hose with the moving air and will exit out the air router exhaust. But the compressed air will still contain some water vapor. 

 

The cutter is designed to allow a small amount of compressed air into the inside of the cutter. This creates a positive pressure inside the cutter helping to keep outside water from getting inside. However, along with the compressed air, water vapor will also enter the unit. The cutter is functioning in an underground environment and the average temperature inside a sewer pipe will be roughly 50 to 60 F (10 to 16 C). The greater the difference between the sewer line and the outside temperature the greater the condensation. Meaning more water vapor will be squeezed out of the air inside the cutter the greater the temperature difference is. The moisture settles on the inside of the cutter and will migrate into your gearmotors and be absorbed by your clutches. This can happen even after only one usage if the water vapor is allowed to stay inside the cutter. Actually the less you use it the greater the problem may be. Running the motors more frequently allows any corrosion around the motor brushes, caused by the moisture, to be worn off before it builds up.

 The solution to this problem is as follows:
  1. Put a good air drier on your output side of your air compressor. A refrigerated drier works the best, but there are other types. Just remember that not all air driers are created equal. Check with your local pneumatics distributor for their recommendation.
  2. The cutter contains a ¼” NPT pipe plug in the center of the rear cap. Remove this at the end of the day and hang the cutter up with the rear cap pointing down. This will allow moisture buildup to exit the rear cap. Just don’t forget to put it back in before the next use.
  3. If you are working in a high humidity area or you plan to have large gaps of time between uses (a week or more), remove the rear cap of the cutter and let it open until the next use. This will allow the moisture to escape and not accumulate inside the cutter. You don’t need to disconnect the electrical connector or airlines inside. Just allow air to circulate inside.
  4. Squirt light oil into the air router at night and rotate the air router a few times. The water that blows through the air router can lay inside when the router stops and will rust the router overnight.